Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Few Key Differences

from "Nue singularite," by Valerie Boutot-Nobrega

Few Key Differences

In the place without stars they have a saying
A dark sky to keep us warm

In the place without stars they do have one star

This is the sun

In the place without stars the symbol of human life
is a lantern

All along the streets neighbors admire one another’s
porch lights and street lamps

In the place without stars lovers take a blanket out
to the field early in their courtship and there they sleep

In the place without stars they use a sunscope
to look at the darkness inside the light

Mythology is linked to weather
and those who study it are seen as charmingly antiquarian

In the place without stars there is also no moon

In the place without stars there are remarkably
few insomniacs

In the place without stars it is still worth looking up




[Image above by Valerie Boutot-Nobrega]

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Autumnal Beauty via David Grossmann...

"Through the Aspen Grove," by David Grossmann
"Cathedral Grove," by David Grossmann


Aren't these paintings by David Grossmann beautiful? Now that it's officially September, fall is within reach. Even though it's 90 degrees in Ohio right now, I can't wait for actual fall and that change in the light that happens...

Monday, August 31, 2015

Begone Strings

"Watching a Cloud, 18 focuses," by Barbora Bobovcakova

Begone Strings

We want the light from the lamp
and the lamp but not its cord
Begone machinery Begone strings
tethering the moving pieces
We tolerate gravity so well only
because of its invisibility If all things
could retreat into their functions
how pure we could feel Clear water
Tubes tucked into the walls Nothing
metal jammed in the garbage disposals
of our throats

[Image above by ]

Friday, August 28, 2015

Same Birds (a micro poem)

"Homing," 2014, by Jiwoon Pak


Same Birds

Look here are the leaving birds
Look here are the returning birds




[Image above by Jiwoon Pak]

Thursday, August 27, 2015

"White Buttons," by Mary Ruefle

"Magnolia Series 1," by M. Elena Segatini

White Buttons
Mary Ruefle

Having been blown away
by a book
I am in the gutter
at the end of the street
in little pieces
like the alphabet
(mother do not worry
letters are not flesh
though there’s meaning in them
but not when they are mean
my letters to you were mean
I found them after you died
and read them and tore them up
and fed them to the wind
thank you for intruding
I love you now leave)
Also at the end of the street
there is a magnolia tree
the white kind
that tatters
after it blooms
so the tree winds up
in the street
Our naked shivering bodies
must be at some distance
missing us    come back
come back they cry
come home
put down that book
whenever you read
you drift away on a raft
you like your parrot
more than you like me
and stuff like that
(dear father
you always were a bore
but I loved you more
than interesting things
and in your honor
I’ve felt the same about myself
and everyone I’ve ever met)
I like to read in tree houses
whenever I can    which is seldom
and sometimes never
The book that blew me away
held all the problems
of the world
and those of being alive
under my nose
but I felt far away from them
at the same time
reading is like that
(I am sorry I did not
go to your funeral
but like you said
on the phone
an insect cannot crawl
to China)
Here at the end of the street
the insects go on living
under the dome
of the pacific sky
If Mary and Joseph
had walked the sixty miles
to Bethlehem vertically
they would have found
themselves floating
in the outer pitch of space
it would have been cold
no inns
a long night
in the dark endless
and when they began to cry
the whole world would think
something had just been born
I like to read into things
as I am continually borne forward
in time by the winds like the snow
(dear sister
you were perfect in every way
like a baby
please tell brother
the only reason
we never spoke
was out of our great love
for each other
which made a big wind
that blew us apart)
I think I am coming back
I feel shoulders
where a parrot could land
though a tree would be
as good a place as any
You cannot teach a tree to talk
Trees can say    it is spring
but not    though bright sunlight
can also be very sad
have you noticed?

[image above by M. Elena Segatini]
[Poem via Poetry Foundation]
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